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Monday, March 17, 2014

Question for the First Lady

Question for the First Lady


Question for the First Lady

Posted: 17 Mar 2014 12:39 PM PDT

Question for the First Lady

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UCV 12-03-2014 Venezuela

Posted: 17 Mar 2014 12:19 PM PDT

Protesta Universidad Central de Venezuela 12-03-2014

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Venezuela UCV

Posted: 17 Mar 2014 11:10 AM PDT

Protesta en la Universidad central de Venezuela 12-03-2014

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militares en altamira

Posted: 17 Mar 2014 11:06 AM PDT

17/03/14 la plaza altamira militarizada.

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Situación en Altamira 2

Posted: 17 Mar 2014 09:28 AM PDT

Plaza Altamira amaneció militarizada

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Situación en Altamira

Posted: 17 Mar 2014 09:25 AM PDT

La Plaza Altamira en Caracas ameneció militarizada

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Initiatives on Study Abroad

Posted: 17 Mar 2014 09:04 AM PDT

What initiatives are being taken by institutions to encourage young people to participate in programs to get more than 1% to participate?

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Proud of our Daddy!

Posted: 17 Mar 2014 08:40 AM PDT

My sister Monique and I wanted to salute our father MSG Miguel Matos for 33 years of service! We'd also like to give our mom Norma a salute as well! She held down the fort while our dad was away. She was always there for us and no matter how hard it was as a "single" mom, she always had a smile on her face and took pride as an "Army Wife". We are thankful for everything you have done dad, you have been a dedicated soldier and have always put your soldiers needs before your own! We are very proud of you and wish you the very best during your retirement! HOOOAHH!!!

Our pictures are from his retirement ceremony at Mac Dill AFB, Tampa, FL.

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Protestas en todos lados

Posted: 17 Mar 2014 08:17 AM PDT

Las protestas en Venezuela no se limitan a la acción colectiva, aquí un joven estudiante protesta solo y gráficamente mientras pide una arepa. Sus palabras son contundentes y son leídas en su morral a donde quiera que va. Tomada el 14 de marzo a las 7:50pm hora de Venezuela en la Urbanización El Paraíso de Caracas.

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ST. PATRICK'S FESTIVAL BERLIN 2014

Posted: 17 Mar 2014 06:53 AM PDT

Four years ago was the first time a St. Patrick Festival was celebrated in Berlin with a small parade. This year the Irish community has come together to organize a bigger volksfest with a parade, art exhibitions, movie festival, live concerts, and open pubs and restaurants serving fish and chips, sheperd pies and the traditional beer Guinness and Kilkenny all night long. The parade this year took place in the district of Berlin-Friedrichshain which ended at the Arena in Berlin-Treptow with live bands, dance troupes, disco, and Irish food. At Alexanderplatz, the city's landmark Fernsehturm (TV tower) was illuminated in glowing shamrock green from the early evening until 5 a.m. the next day.

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Protest against cuban intervetion in Caracas

Posted: 17 Mar 2014 06:15 AM PDT

Today March 16 the people in Caracas march in protest against the cuban intervention in the Army force

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St.Patrick's Day Parade, Valletta, Malta

Posted: 17 Mar 2014 06:09 AM PDT

The irish Maltese Circle held its annual St.Patrick's Day Parade in Valletta, Malta. The large group of people from a mixed variety of nationality, dressed in green clothing, leprechauns and wearing other funny props, walked, danced and sang their way down Valletta's main street to the main square to enjoy irish folk music, Irish dance and a couple of Maltese folk songs. The bright sunny day made this a well attended and enjoy full event.

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*New Video - Study Abroad

Posted: 17 Mar 2014 04:42 AM PDT

(No Description)

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Abroad in Taiwan

Posted: 17 Mar 2014 03:01 AM PDT

I thought that my study abroad experience wouldn't actually make a difference in my life because it was my origin country. I was wrong. Studying abroad helped me analyze the different culture, language, and people. I would always compare how different Taiwan is to America. Because of these different comparisons, I am able to open my horizons. I believe that studying abroad isn't just about having fun, but experiencing the different culture and atmosphere. Sometimes I would wonder why people of the same origin would act so differently. For example, I have seen students my age bump into people without saying sorry. It also feels weird when you don't say 'bless you' to someone who sneezed. Being in a different country and experiencing different things can make you feel blessed for what you have. Every place in Taiwan gives you a different atmosphere and you are able to experience every place differently. Taiwanese people in the countryside are nicer than the people in the city. The countryside people are very honest and simple. The city people have a faster footstep and are less likely to care about many things. In Taiwan, students are brought up to care and focus on education. Everything else will be taken care of. All they need to do is focus on school. The way Taiwanese students get into high school and college is by test taking. If they obtain a higher score, they are able to get into a better school. With this type of education system, they are unable to focus on other important things in life, which includes how to treat others. Taiwanese parents are also too focused on their work, which makes some of them lack good parenting. In American, a student should be well-rounded. Manners and behavior in America are also viewed as very important. Although this may be the case for Taiwan, they are very good at recycling and aiming for a green economy. They are also very good at international relations. At National Taiwan University, you can always seen different business conferences or competitions held by different countries. In Taiwan, you can always see people from different countries.
Of course, there are positives and negatives in each country, but these are always things to learn. I am grateful to study abroad in Taiwan and learn new perspectives.

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What about Non-Americans wanting to study in the United States?

Posted: 16 Mar 2014 11:52 PM PDT

Mrs. Obama, I know that many of the questions here are from the point of view of young Americans on studying outside the U.S. I am sure many from other nations would likewise want to experience American education. What commitment could you make regarding this?

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We do not have fear!

Posted: 16 Mar 2014 11:19 PM PDT

Protester fighting at Caracas

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Car flys down cliffs into the Ocean

Posted: 16 Mar 2014 11:15 PM PDT

This driver for some unknown (Sunday March 16) reason sped down a residential street failed to make the turn went down a paved ramp hit a curb went airborne sheared off 75 feet of 2" stainless steel hand railing flipped and crashed into the jagged rocks at Sunset Cliffs today. Surfers tried to extricate him to no avail. His car had collapsed around him. By my count his car was 250 feet from where it left the road.
San Diego Firefighters, Lifeguards and Police responded. With precision they cut the car apart as the surf splashed at their legs. They administered first aid got him out of the demolished car and into a sling to be air lifted out of the crash area. When the rescue was complete the several hundred people who watched the whole event unfold from high on the cliffs broke out in spontaneous applause....As of right now no word on what caused the accident or the current condition of the driver.

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Holi - Festival of Colors

Posted: 16 Mar 2014 11:14 PM PDT

Children celebrate Holi in Hyderabad, India.Holi is a hindu festival of colors celebrated in month of March

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16M Marcha contra la Injerencia Cubana

Posted: 16 Mar 2014 08:34 PM PDT

Piquete de la PNB se ubicó en la avenida Río de Janeiro, el puente Veracruz y otros puntos del municipio Baruta, que serían parte de la ruta de la movilización contra la injerencia cubana. Fotografo Eduardo Barrios

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Which Country Would You Pick and Why?

Posted: 16 Mar 2014 08:33 PM PDT

Hello Mrs. Obama.  This is Kate, a high school senior in California.

 

If your daughters were to study abroad, which country would you pick and what do you hope they would learn?

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Yuriy SERGEYEV, Ambassador of Ukraine to the UN: "Today at UNSC wasn't a voice of Russia, but of USSR"

Posted: 16 Mar 2014 07:42 PM PDT

NEW YORK, USA – MARCH 15, CNN iReport – Yuriy SERGEYEV, Ukrainian ambassador to the UN commented Russia's decision to veto UNSC resolution. Especially for CNN iReport.

 

"Security council today hold its seventh meeting on Ukraine, which was the logic result of the previous six meetings where we exchanged the views on the situation in Ukraine. They were all about Russian invasion in Crimea. Today was an attempt to adapt the resolution on the stance of these Security Council members has to be. Tomorrow's referendum has to be aggression as it is Russian position - vetoed the resolution - says by itself. So we have an aggressor, who demonstrated it publically today. So it opens the doors to another measure to be implemented - sanctions which will bring to isolation of Russia aggression, if they are not able to stop this idiotism which is ruining whole system of international security" – the Ambassador said.

 

Journalist: Andrey Vasiliev
Producer: Olga Mozkova

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Phagwah/Holi celebration in Queens, NY

Posted: 16 Mar 2014 07:13 PM PDT

The 26th Annual Phagwah/Holi parade and festival attracted thousand of revelers despite the cold weather in NYC this weekend.

This festival celebrated the new year and takes place on the Sunday after the full moon before the beginning of Spring.

The parade took place in Richmond Hill, Queens which is a neighborhood in one of the 5 boroughs in NYC. It is home to a large Indian and Guyanese community.

Happy Holi! Happy Spring! Goodbye Winter!

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16 de Marzo Marcha en Caracas

Posted: 16 Mar 2014 05:01 PM PDT

El pueblo Caraqueño salio a Marchar 16 de marzo desde diferentes puntos con el destino final La Carlota, pero un piquete conformados por la Policia Nacional Bolivariana le impidio el paso a la altura del Puente de Veracruz . Fotografo Eduardo Barrios

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Protesta in Caracas continue

Posted: 16 Mar 2014 03:25 PM PDT

Protesters continúe to march in Caracas

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Chicago - St. Patricks 2014

Posted: 16 Mar 2014 02:49 PM PDT

My friends and I, had an amazing lucky day with a not too cold weather and charming people during the St. Patricks event. The happiness was all around, in every block and street, and in every event we watched. It was magical, like everyone knowing everyone, that is what makes Chicago so amazing.

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Being a Youth Ambassador

Posted: 16 Mar 2014 01:46 PM PDT

I was 14 when the travel bug first bit me, when the wanderlust creeped into my veins. Growing up in a suburban town, I had never travelled farther than Canada, bur I wanted to see more of the world. I couldn't tell you what it was that made me realize there was so much more out there, maybe my world history class or an article I read, but I knew that I had to go out and explore the vast unknown that was the world around me. I applied for a few different scholarships to travel abroad, and on April 13, 2012 I received the e-mail that I had been accepted to the Kennedy-Lugar YES Abroad Youth Exchange and Study Abroad Program (KL YES Abroad). Created after September 11th, the YES program is sponsored by the Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs to create understanding between American youth and youth from countries with significant Muslim populations. It sends 65 Americans abroad each year, as well as brings in 600 teens from other countries to attend high school and live with families in the US. The scholarship I received sent me to spend my sophomore year abroad in Malaysia. Before I left, people in my school bombarded me with questions, everything from whether or not I would be living in trees to how I would live without Starbucks for a year.
I was 15 when I got on a plane and left behind everything I knew, the town I had lived in my whole life. When I first stepped out of the airport into the Malaysian heat, I was immediately struck by how different everything was. It was a sensory overload. People were shouting in different languages, the air was full of a spicy scent from street vendors, shopkeepers called out for people to look at their brightly colored fabrics and sparkling jewelry. I was simultaneously hooked and overwhelmed.
As part of my program, I lived with a Malaysian host family. I was completely immersed in their culture, living under their roof and becoming ingrained in their daily routine. They were eager to share. They took me back to their village for the last few days of Ramadan and the subsequent Eid celebration. I fasted with them for five days, and helped to cook traditional foods, and of course eat them. My host family didn't speak English very well, and I left the US knowing three words of sign language, so there was a lot of sign language and some miscommunications at first, but the bond I developed with them far surpassed any cultural barriers. After a while, the "host" in host family disappeared. I was a daughter and a sister, and they were my second family. They were there for me when I was at my most homesick times, and put up with my sad attempts at cooking American dishes (granted, they had no stove so I was at a disadvantage). Despite all our differences-- religious, cultural, geographic, physical, we were a family. I also attended a local Malaysian school, where I was the only white face in a sea of Asian features. It meant all eyes were always on me. My very first day of school, I had to stand up in front of every single student and teacher and introduce myself. I was nervous and shy and probably a little awkward, but I was met with thunderous applause. They were so excited that an American wanted to learn about their culture. For them, I was a face and a name to a country they had heard so much about. This of course raised some questions, and I must have told at least 400 people that Americans don't eat McDonald's every day, or that high school isn't really like High School Musical, there's a lot less singing for one. The Malaysian education system is very different than the American one; the students stay in one classroom the whole day, and the different subject teachers switch classrooms. The class kind of becomes like a little family, as they spend the whole day together. The 41 girls in my class became translators, cultural teachers, and above all friends. One of my favorite days of school was a few days before "summer" break (there are no seasons in Malaysia). My biology teacher, who always made a point to slip me mooncakes and other treats, took my class outside for a few hours. He cut down coconuts from one of the trees on the school grounds and we shared them, sipping the sweet coconut water, then scooping out the flesh. It was one of those moments where we were enjoying each other's presence as humans, rather than nationalities.
In Malay, there is a word "boleh." Directly translated, it means can, but in Malaysia it's more of as sure, why not? In developing a "boleh" attitude towards my exchange year I had some of the best adventures. I went jungle trekking in the highlands to see the world's largest (and smelliest) flower, I waded through a river to learn how to cook handmade bread over a fire, I saw countless sunsets and rises, I fell in love with exploring. Malaysia is a multi-cultural country, so not only did I learn about my host family's Islamic traditions, I spent time with Indians and Chinese to learn about theirs. I had henna done and dressed up in sarees for Diwali, the Hindu festival of light. I went to Buddhist chanting ceremonies and released paper lanterns into the sky for Lunar NEw Year. I learned so much, just from everyday life. I was also very lucky to participate in community service, teaching English to students on an island in the Northeast of the country, giving presentations about the United States to Malaysian students, serving food to people making religious pilgrimages.
Studying abroad wasn't always easy. I got homesick, I missed out on a year of sweet sixteens and school dances and Friday nights at the mall, but I learned so much more. You really become the face of your country for your host community. There were questions that were hard to answer: if Americans really hate Muslims, why we were sending troops to the Middle East, my opinions on gun laws. In offering my perspective, I think what others took away from that was that not all Americans fit the stereotypes. Misconceptions happen for a reason, and if I changed even one mind by sharing my experience as an American girl, then I made an impact.
So what do you gain from exchange? There's the tangible stuff, the fluency in a new language, the sparkly sarees and bangles your suitcases will be full of when you return, the stamps in your passport, but it's the stuff you can't see that matters most. The family and friends you now have,the greater appreciation you have for your host and your home country, the memories of standing in the village watching fireworks with people you didn't even know a year ago. A country I knew little about before I went there became a second home. The world has opened up to me, places becoming more than colors and lines on a map.
I left the United States as a shy, oblivious, and typical American teen, but I came back different. I became much more comfortable with myself, more confident, more tolerant, more aware. I now know what I want to do with my life, and have a pretty much endless list of countries I want to explore. Exchange wasn't a year of my life, it was a life in a year.
Maybe the question isn't what is there to gain from going abroad, it's what is there to lose.
My name is Hannah Foster, I'm 17 years old, and studying abroad changed my life.

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Finding the courage

Posted: 16 Mar 2014 01:29 PM PDT

Many students of this generation are already struggling in paying their normal tuition. So, how does a student go about asking their parents to help with the additional financial costs of studying abroad?

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Reluctant to Study Abroad

Posted: 16 Mar 2014 12:02 PM PDT

As a college professor who teaches at a university where study abroad as part of the undergraduate experience is highly recommended but not mandatory, I encounter students who don't understand the importance of enriching their lives by studying in another country and turn down the opportunity. While I can offer all the right reasons for studying abroad, Mrs. Obama's urging will make a bigger impression on the students than will mine.

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Knowing the differences to be part of the world

Posted: 16 Mar 2014 11:42 AM PDT

Experience new cultures, new languages​​, new customs, and so could understand the differences that make our only planet.

By understanding how each people think, how you communicate, we are doing more than a learning process, we are expanding our minds and interacting to be part of humanity.

A world that is known, is a world where there are no fights, no space for them, it becomes a world only with the same ideals and goals.

I congratulate those who have such program, study abroad, knowledge of new languages​​, integration with other peoples space and Comprehension of each within this fragile ball called Earth, thus making the evolution of each being into something concrete.

And my question is: how Mrs. Obama sees it as an important tool for world peace so desired by everyone.

Thank you very much for this opportunity.

Julio Cesar Camerini
Journalist-São Paulo-Brazil

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